This AI robot mimics human expressions to build trust with users

Scientists at Columbia University have developed a robot that mimics the facial expressions of humans to gain their trust. Named Eva, the droid uses deep learning to analyze human facial gestures captured by a camera. Cables and motors then pull on different points of the robot’s soft skin to mimic the expressions of nearby people in real-time. The effect is pretty creepy, but the researchers say that giving androids this ability can facilitate more natural and engaging human-robot interactions. Eva produces different expressions by utilizing one or more of six basic emotions: anger, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, and surprise. Per the study paper: For example, while joy…

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Grace the robot nurse can’t replace human caregivers

The makers of Sophia the robot have unveiled another creepy-looking humanoid: Grace, a healthcare droid designed to help the elderly and isolated. The prototype device uses AI to diagnose patients and a thermal camera to take their temperatures. It can also provide social stimulation and talk therapy, Reuters reports. The robot could provide some support to overworked medical staff and people feeling lonely during the pandemic. But, at best, it will augment rather than replace human carers. Social robots are already widely used in Japan — and some users clearly love them. Ultimately, they may become essential in an aging world with worker shortages, but…This story continues at The Next Web

AI devs claim they’ve created a robot that demonstrates a ‘primitive form of empathy’

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Here’s why we should never trust AI to identify our emotions

Imagine you are in a job interview. As you answer the recruiter’s questions, an artificial intelligence (AI) system scans your face, scoring you for nervousness, empathy and dependability. It may sound like science fiction, but these systems are increasingly used, often without people’s knowledge or consent. Emotion recognition technology (ERT) is in fact a burgeoning multi-billion-dollar industry that aims to use AI to detect emotions from facial expressions. Yet the science behind emotion recognition systems is controversial: there are biases built into the systems. [Read: Can AI read your emotions? Try it for yourself] Many companies use ERT to test customer…This story continues at The Next Web

Why robots make great surgeons and crappy nurses

Robotic surgery systems are used in thousands of hospitals around the world. A decade ago they were clunky machines built to assist with routine procedures. Today, they’re capable of conducting end-to-end surgeries without human aid. Recent leaps in the field of deep learning have made difficult tasks such as surgery, electronics assembly, and piloting a fighter jet relatively simple. It might take a decade to train a human in all the necessary medical knowledge required for them to perform brain surgery. And that cost is the same for each subsequent human surgeon thereafter. It takes about the same investment for… This story continues at The Next Web

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