Play these 3 “mind games” to be a better leader

Spoiler alert: these games aren’t about manipulation but they will help you sharpen your thinking and work better with others.

Merriam Webster defines “mind games” as, “A psychological tactic used to manipulate or intimidate—usually used in plural.”

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