How to Reduce AI Bias Like Google Does

Social movements of the past year have helped shine a light on the many ways in which human bias can creep into the algorithms that influence a growing portion of our everyday lives–despite the developer’s own lack of malicious intention. During a panel at CES on Tuesday, Google’s head of product inclusion, Annie Jean-Baptiste, shared…

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Zut alors! France spanks Google over ‘misleading’ hotel ranking algorithm

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Google unveils privacy-friendly AI cookie killer

Third-party cookies might have a tasty name, but they can be pretty poisonous when they’re quietly tracking your online behavior. A new Google machine learning initiative aims to replace the rancid cookies with a privacy-first alternative. The search giant calls the system Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC). FLoC (pronounced “flock”) allows businesses to send ads to groups of potential customers rather than specific individuals. The system uses machine learning algorithms to create clusters of people with similar browsing habits. All the data analyzed by the algorithms — including your web history — is kept private on the browser and not uploaded anywhere else.… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Google

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