How Bumble’s clever design helped the app go public

Lara Mendonça built Bumble’s product design team during the pandemic. Her strategy contributed to a wildly successful IPO.

Bumble went public on Thursday, and investors were very much interested in swiping right. The dating app, which soared in its first day of trading, is well-known for letting women make the first move. And in fact much of its success is due to this fundamental design decision.

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You know about human-centered design. Now meet breast-centered design

Breastfeeding can be excruciating. Frida Mom creates products that addresses women’s pain, not just nourishing babies.
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