Here's the pitch deck finance startup Clark used to persuade Chinese tech giant Tencent to lead its $85 million round

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Frankfurt-based Insurtech startup Clark has raised €69 million ($85 million) in fresh funding led by Chinese tech giant Tencent. 

Clark offers digital insurance management options allowing users to see their insurance choices in one place and helps to identify better offers through its platform. The German startup has 300,000 customers in Germany and Austria and is aiming for a million in the next three years, the company said. 

Founded in 2015, Clark’s offering is part of a bevy of insurtech disruptors in Germany competing to digitize the country’s predominantly paper-based policy offerings. 

The Series C funding was led by Tencent alongside existing investors including Portag3 Ventures, White Star Capital and Yabeo. The company declined to comment on valuation. 

“We wanted to raise last April but the stock market had collapsed and we thought maybe it would be ridiculous, so we waited until the markets calmed down again,” Christopher Oster, Clark cofounder and CEO, told Insider in an interview. “Tencent are one of the most successful investors out there, they compliment our existing investors, and they allow us an insight into the Chinese tech landscape which is not always the easiest to get a view on from the outside.”

Clark picked up the funding process remotely in September and closed the round in the week leading up to Christmas 2020. “We exceeded our plan for 2020 and will use this funding to continue growing our product and services into 2021,” Oster added.

Check out Clark’s pitch deck below:

SEE ALSO: Fintech startups like Revolut and Luno are seeing a boom in demand from consumers rushing to invest in cryptocurrencies amid major bitcoin interest

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Checkout.com was founded by a college dropout and just became Europe's most valuable startup after raising $450 million at a $15 billion valuation

Summary List PlacementPayments firm Checkout.com is now Europe’s most valuable startup after raising $450 million at a $15 billion valuation. 
It’s one of the largest recent funding rounds in Europe and makes the company the fourth most valuable privately owned fintech worldwide.
Founded by college dropout Guillaume Pousaz in 2012, Checkout.com raised Europe’s biggest ever Series A round of $230 million in May 2019, at a valuation of $2 billion. That was followed by a $150 million Series B in June last year at a $5.5 billion valuation.
Checkout.com powers the payments process of major companies like soon-to-be-public food delivery unicorn Deliveroo, fintech giant TransferWise, and Adidas.
“We had an exceptional year last year, particularly towards the end of 2020 with around $1 billion a week of e-commerce volumes,” Checkout’s founder and CEO Pousaz told Insider. “We had no plans to raise but had remained in touch with investors who have a long-term view of the business. This is going to be a generation-defining company.” 
The startup claims to have added more than 500 new enterprise clients in 2020 including Coinbase, Pizza Hut, H&M, Grab, Klarna, Farfetch, and messaging app Telegram. The company’s competitors include Stripe, last valued at $36 billion, and Dutch payment firm Adyen, which went public in 2018.
Checkout’s financial filings for the full-year 2019, parts of which have been examined by Insider, show revenue of $146.4 million, up from $74.8 million in 2018. Adjusted EBITDA was $5.47 million for the year. The firm’s full filings are not yet publicly available, and were due to be filed with the UK’s company register on 31 December. Pousaz said that the accounts were filed on time at the end of December, but could take two weeks to appear.
Its Series C was led by hedge fund giant Tiger Global Management with participation from Greenoaks Capital and existing investors amid a boom in interest in fintech startups from the private equity world. Checkout.com claims to have tripled its payment processing volume during 2020 as e-commerce boomed during the pandemic. 
The global payments market was worth just under $2 trillion in 2019, according to research from McKinsey. Checkout’s staggering valuation is almost triple the price it reached six months ago.
“We’ve never been chasing league tables and have always been very disciplined in our approach,” Pousaz added. “Our product in the hands of some of the most forward-thinking merchants in the world which is a validation in our business. Our investors understand public markets and are investing in the industries of tomorrow.”
Amid a growth in demand for fintech, high valuations are everywhere. Payments rival Stripe could seek a $100 billion valuation in its next round, Bloomberg reported. Similarly, US challenger bank Chime hit a new $14.5 billion valuation last year while buy now, pay later giant Klarna raised $650 million at a near $11 billion valuation in September 2020.
When asked about the hot IPO market and Checkout’s chances of going public, Pousaz said: “It’s certain that we will be a public company, we have public market investors on our cap table but there is no pressure on us. The reality is that our Series A was around 20 months ago so our timing is dependent on our roadmap.”SEE ALSO: Fintech startups like Revolut and Luno are seeing a boom in demand from consumers rushing to invest in cryptocurrencies amid major bitcoin interest
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We got an exclusive look at the pitch deck $3 billion valued healthtech startup Hinge Health used to raise $300 million

Summary List PlacementThe global digital health sector has unsurprisingly boomed amid the ravages of the coronavirus pandemic, with companies and consumers increasingly seeking out alternatives to in-person services.
Investors too are pouring more money into the space. One recent beneficiary is Hinge Health, which raised $300 million earlier in January to become the most highly valued private healthtech in the US, the company said. 
The Series D round was jointly led by private equity giants Coatue Management and Tiger Global and raised the valuation of startup to $3 billion, according to Hinge Health’s announcement.
The San Franc iso-based startup offers a digital clinic for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain and is available to more than 300 enterprise customers in the US. The company’s customer base tripled and revenue quadrupled in 2020, according to Hinge Health’s CEO Daniel Perez. 
“It was a very interesting year for us — in March every investor was concerned due to the pandemic, but we decided to stay the course,” Perez told Insider in an interview. “We knew there would be a counter revolution after a five or so week period where people weren’t answering the phone. We said, ‘If we can overcome this and execute we will win’  — and we were one of fastest growing companies in tech last year.”
The startup, founded in 2015, avoided layoffs or salary cuts and continued to hire last year. This new fundraising will help Hinge Health continue on its growth trajectory, with its current 550 headcount likely to double by the end of 2021, Perez said. The company was named as a healthtech company changing the industry recently.
Amid a crazy year for IPO listings in the US, and a likely continued surge into 2021, Hinge Health is primed for a debut on the public markets. 
“There was enormous investor interest when we opened the round — within 24 hours we had more than $400 million in commitments,” Perez added. “They [Coatue and Tiger Global] are the two best funds for a pre-IPO round, it’s very rare that they co-lead the same round.”
The two private equity firms’ involvement continues a trend of major hedge funds and private equity piling into late stage startups. 
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Read more: Investors are pouring cash into mental health startups during a rough 2020. Here are 19 to watch, picked by top European VCs.
Despite the obvious incentives provided by public markets to buzzy startups, Perez claims that the company’s growth path is “laser focused” on growing its digital clinic for MSK.
“There is no pressure to IPO soon,” said Perez. “We’re hoping to be in a position to go public, or whatever, in 2022.”
To put Hinge Health’s rise into context, the company’s previous funding round (a $90 million fundraise in February 2020) valued the business at $428 million, one-sixth of the most recent valuation.
Perez said there’s still ample opportunity to grow further. “Healthcare is one-sixth of the US economy and around one-fifth of that is related to MSK,” he said. “That’s around 3% of [gross domestic product] so it’s a huge area of spend to disrupt.”
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Payment startup Curve has raised a fresh $95 million but faces questions over its late financial filings

Summary List PlacementPayment card startup Curve has landed a fresh $95 million in Series C funding, but has raised eyebrows for filings its 2019 financial accounts late.
Founded in April 2018, Curve has now raised some $175 million in funding. The startup offers a payment card that digitally aggregates all of a user’s debit and credit cards.
Unlike in the US, private firms of a certain size in the UK are obliged to file detailed annual accounts. It can be a valuable snapshot into the state of a business.
Curve was due to file its full-year results for 2019 on 31 December but missed the deadline. Sifted reported that the firm had already been granted extensions to its filing deadline in March and October. Curve is also under caution by the UK’s financial regulator over its lack of records.  The fine for not filing accounts is, however, negligible. 
Asked why the filings were late, a Curve representative said: “We have now filed our 2019 accounts at Companies House. These were delayed by a few days, as a result of our focus being fully centered on a successful Series C fundraise.”
Insider has previously raised questions about Curve’s transparency.
During a crowdfunding drive in September 2019, Curve did not reveal a monthly active user figure, but claimed in an investor pitch deck it would reach 4 million customers by the end of 2020. The firm subsequently raised £6 million ($7.7 million) from the drive. Figures obtained by Insider for May 2019 indicated monthly active users were a tiny fraction of its then-500,000 customer number, implying the firm was struggling at that point to keep users loyal.
A Curve representative on Monday declined to disclose active user base, but said the company had seen significant growth.
“The number of active users is commercially sensitive information, but what we can say is that over the past 12 months we have seen significant growth both in customer numbers, which now total 2 million up from around a million at the start of 2020, and the value of transactions processed by our platform, which now exceeds £2 billion up from around £1 billion over the same period,” they said. “Both of these metrics demonstrate our impressive growth trajectory of the business and the appeal of our products and services. Investors too are comfortable with our progress as proved by our successful Series C round.”
And one early investor in Curve told Insider that they were fully on-board with Curve and had no issue with either its lack of filing or MUA figures. 
With its new funds, Curve is planning to grow its headcount from around 300 currently to around 600 in the next 12 months by hiring across Europe and the US. The company also plans to develop a new product called Curve Credit. 
In addition to its 2019 accounts being overdue on Companies House, , the company has been accused of a lack of transparency. 
The funding round was led by IDC Ventures, Fuel Venture Capital and Vulcan Capital, with participation from OneMain Financial and Novum Capital. Curve previously raised a $55 million Series B in September 2019. 
“The proceeds of the fundraise will be used to support international expansion and research and development,” Shachar Bialick, founder and CEO at Curve, told Insider.”Our expansion plans will focus primarily on launching in the US and deepening our foothold in the European market, which has shown a very strong pool during 2020. Both markets offer incredibly exciting growth prospects in 2021 and beyond.”
The company declined to comment on its new valuation. SEE ALSO: The London fintech aiming to become the ‘Spotify for money’ raised $55 million using this pitch deck
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