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Google Search’s new feature makes it easier to weed out unreliable results

Google Search is adding a feature to help you verify your search results are showing reliable information. Search will now show a menu icon “next to most results on Google” that you can tap on to access more information about a particular site without having to actually click through. This makes it a little easier to verify if the search result comes from a source that’s likely to be trustworthy. This information is mostly sourced from Wikipedia, which Google notes “provides free, reliable information” (much to the chagrin of history teachers everywhere).  If Wikipedia information isn’t available, you’ll instead see… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Google

Google Search has a new mobile design — come spot the differences

Google Search is getting a new, lighter, bubblier design for mobile devices. It’s rolling out “in the coming days.” Here’s what it looks like: For reference, this is what the old search looked like: Some of the changes include: A brighter design that allows people to focus on information “instead of the design elements around it.” Bolder text in search results, making it easier to distinguish between different types of information. This also includes using more of “Google’s own font.” Results are now edge-to-edge, rather than being framed in little cards with shadows. This gives results a little more room… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Google

Facebook’s AI for describing photos in your feed is way smarter now

The internet is not easy to navigate for people with visual imparities. While there are screen reader applications to help them, often, websites or users don’t add alt text to images. In turn, the reader can’t describe to the user what the picture looks like. Thankfully, we have seen plenty of AI models in the last few years that make this task easier by automatically captioning photos. Facebook, which introduced a model called Automatic Alternative Text (AAT) in 2016, has updated its model to identify objects in a photo 10 times more efficiently than before, and in greater detail. The refreshed model can… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook

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