Google announces new AI-powered heart and breathing monitors for Pixel phones

Google announced today that it’s adding AI-powered measurements of heart and respiration rates to the Google Fit app. The tech uses a combination of sensors and computer vision algorithms to take measurements through a smartphone camera. The Big G said the features will be available from next month on Pixel phones, with more Android devices to follow. Users will then be able to measure their breathing rate by placing their head and upper torso in view of the phone’s front-facing camera. [Read: How much does it cost to buy, own, and run an EV? It’s not as much as you think] Their…

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