EU commission to take hard-line stance against ‘high-risk’ AI

The European Commission is set to unveil a new set of regulations for artificial intelligence products. While some AI tech would be outright banned, other potentially harmful systems would be forced through a vetting process before developers could release them to the general public. The proposed legislation, per a leak obtained by Politico’s Melissa Heikkila, would ban systems it deems as “contravening the Union values or violating fundamental rights.” The regulations, if passed, could limit the potential harm done by AI-powered systems involved in “high-risk” areas of operation such as facial recognition, and social credit systems. Per an EU statement:…

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