Can AI read your emotions? Try it for yourself

Emotion recognition AI is bunk. Don’t get me wrong, AI that recognizes human sentiment and emotion can be very useful. For example, it can help identify when drivers are falling asleep behind the wheel. But what it cannot do, is discern how a human being is actually feeling by the expression on their face. You don’t have to take my word for it, you can try it yourself here. Dovetail Labs, a scientific research and consultancy company, recently created a website that explains how modern “emotion recognition” systems built on deep learning work. Typically when companies do stuff like this,…

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