Can AI be hypnotized?

It’s no longer considered science fiction fodder to imagine a human-level machine intelligence in our lifetimes. Year after year we see the status quo in AI research shattered as yesterday’s algorithms bear way to today’s systems. One day, perhaps within a matter of decades, we might build machines with artificial neural networks that imitate our brains in every meaningful way. And when that happens, it’ll be important to make sure they’re not as easy to hack as we are. Robo-hypno-tism? The Holy Grail of AI is human-level intelligence. Modern AI might seem pretty smart given all the hyperbolic headlines you…

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The key to making AI green is quantum computing

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