AI devs claim they’ve created a robot that demonstrates a ‘primitive form of empathy’

Columbia University researchers have developed a robot that displays a “glimmer of empathy” by visually predicting how another machine will behave. The robot learns to forecast its partner’s future actions and goals by observing a few video frames of its actions The researchers first programmed the partner robot to move towards green circles in a playpen of around 3×2 feet in size. It would sometimes move directly towards a green circle spotted by its cameras, but if the circles were hidden by an obstacle, it would either roll towards a different circle or not move at all. After the observer robot watched the…

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Maker of Sophia the robot plans to sell droids to people seeking company during COVID

The maker of Sophia the robot plans to sell droids to people craving company during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hanson Robotics aims to roll out four models — including Sophia — in the first half of 2021. “Sophia and Hanson robots are unique by being so human-like,” CEO David Hanson told Reuters. “That can be so useful during these times where people are terribly lonely and socially isolated.” The Hong Kong-based firm aims to sell “thousands” of the droids this year. Hanson believes they could help fight the pandemic, which has accelerated demand for automation and robotics. [Read: How this company leveraged AI to become the Netflix… This story continues at The Next Web

Scientists developed an AI system for predicting human psychosis

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What the hell is an AI factory?

If you follow the news on artificial intelligence, you’ll find two diverging threads. The media and cinema often portray AI with human-like capabilities, mass unemployment, and a possible robot apocalypse. Scientific conferences, on the other hand, discuss progress toward artificial general intelligence while acknowledging that current AI is weak and incapable of many of the basic functions of the human mind. But regardless of where they stand in comparison to human intelligence, today’s AI algorithms have already become a defining component for many sectors, including health care, finance, manufacturing, transportation, and many more. And very soon “no field of human endeavor will remain independent of artificial… This story continues at The Next Web

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