A personal branding expert shares what it takes to build a successful reputation

For branding maestro Tom Peters, passionate networking is table stakes when cultivating your brand.

Almost 25 years ago, management guru Tom Peters kicked off the personal branding revolution with a Fast Company article so bold and brassy it nearly jumped off the page. Titled “The Brand Called You,” it was a resounding call to action to brand yourself. Peters proclaimed: “To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called You. . . . You’re not defined by your job title and you’re not confined by your job description. Starting today you are a brand.”

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